KEYNOTE WEBCAST: A Critical Look at Erasing the Stigma of Mental Illness, What Says the Dodo Bird?

By December 3, 2015 No Comments

Authors: Pat Corrigan

Year: 2015

Event: 2015 TheMHS Conference

Subject:

Type of resource: Video

Abstract: Pat Corrigan speaks at the 2015 TheMHS Conference in Canberra.

ABSTRACT: The Dodo Bird is an Alice in Wonderland character who, at the end of a race, concludes “Everybody has won and all must have prizes.” The Dodo Bird effect has been used to describe a conundrum resulting from behavioral change research that fails to distinguish superiority among discrete strategies for psychotherapeutic change. Research on stigma change may find itself at this point. Advocates have developed and implemented multiple approaches to changing stigma; might some of these be shown to have more beneficial impact than others? This presentation examines both the benefits and the negative unintended consequences of stigma change programs, considering the effects of education versus contact on the stigma of mental illness.

BIO: Patrick Corrigan is Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the Illinois Institute of Technology. His research examines psychiatric disability and the impact of stigma on recovery and rehabilitation. Currently, he is principal investigator of the National Consortium for Stigma and Empowerment (NCSE); funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, NCSE is a collaboration of investigators and advocates from more than a dozen institutions. Corrigan has authored or edited more fourteen books, most recently, The Stigma of Disease and Disability. He is also principal investigator of grants from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities as well as the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute on integrated care primary and behavioral health care. He has written more than 300 peer-reviewed articles, is editor emeritus of the American Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, and editor of a new journal published by the American Psychological Association, Stigma and Health.

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