S54: Using the Recovery Assessment Scale – Domains and Stages (RAS-DS) with young people: examining measurement properties, relevance, acceptability and feasibility.

By September 11, 2019 No Comments

Authors: Nicola Hancock, Justin Scanlan, Michelle Kightley, Anthony Harris

Year: 2019

Event: 2019 TheMHS Conference

Subject: Using the Recovery Assessment Scale – Domains and Stages (RAS-DS) with young people: examining measurement properties, relevance, acceptability and feasibility.

Type of resource: Conference Presentations and Papers

Abstract:

Biography:

Dr Justin Scanlan is an occupational therapist with a clinical and research background in mental health practice. He is currently a senior lecturer and course director for the Bachelor of Applied Science (Occupational Therapy) at The University of Sydney.

Michelle is an Occupational Therapist working as the Team Leader of the Blacktown Early Access Team in Western Sydney Local Health District and a Mental Health Facilitator with the University of Sydney. (32) She has experience working in a number of different areas of mental health including inpatient, community and NGO’s.

The Recovery Assessment Scale – Domains and Stages (RAS-DS) is an Australian developed, internationally used self-report measure of mental health recovery. While this instrument has demonstrated good measurement properties and acceptability to practitioners and consumers in adult mental health services, this study examined the measurement properties, feasibility and acceptability of RAS-DS in a NSW youth mental health service context (Prevention, Early Intervention and Recovery Service [PEIRS].
Fifty-eight young person-clinician dyads participated. As well as completing the RAS-DS, young people and their clinician independently completed a ‘usefulness’ questionnaire. Analysis of RAS-DS data demonstrated that RAS-DS has acceptable measurement properties. Data from the usefulness questionnaire suggest that RAS-DS is deemed useful, relevant and easy to use by both young people and clinicians. Ninety-one percent of young people completed the RAS-DS in less than 15 minutes. There was less measurement precision for those further along their recovery journeys. Additionally, the data highlights some potential differences in the recovery journeys of younger Australians, and this will be discussed.

Learning Objectives

Learning Objective 1: The audience will leave with an understanding of the usefulness and relevance of using a recovery self-report measure with young people.

Learning Objective 2: While internationally, mental health services are called to pivot towards a more recovery-oriented approach, less attention has been given to the acceptability and relevance of this approach and tools to measure this approach within youth mental health services. This study does just that.

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